Category Archives: Club Information

Crane Out Monday 28th October 2019, and photos of new Jetty in progress.

Crane out date is Monday 28th October.

The crane has been booked, so let’s hope for good weather and low winds.  HW 10:55 GMT (clocks go back the night before!), 10.1m.  Members involved need to be on site early before 8am.

The craning plan is on the Clubhouse notice board – if your details are incorrect or missing, please contact a Committee Member as soon as possible.

Prepare in advance by slackening all guard rail wires and with two  lengths of rope around the hull, one forward and on aft on the desired lifting points, so that the strops can be pulled into position in a timely manor.  Please ask if unsure.

New Jetty in Progress. Thirteen photographs

Starting a the bottom of the slip and working back towards the club house:

1.

The extremity of the existing jetty is to be preserved.

2.

On the left hand side jetty, John Gorse proudly oversees progress

3.

The starboard side posts (rows 7 & 8 ) at the far end still await there complementary port side post.

4.

View of completed pairs, rows 6, 5, and 4. Note that rows 5 and 4 now have the scantling affixed.

6.

7.

Rows 4, 3, and 2 with scantlings and decking. The march of progress!

8.

Same as above put further back.

9.

Yet to be joined with the start of the existing jetty (the first post).

10.

Timber yet to join the affray. Five quotes for timber were sought with massive differences in price.

11.

Going slight back in time from the above images. Before the scantlings and decking.

13.

Our WMYC Club sadly flag flying at halfmast in respect of our dearly departed Pablo Bars.

The boat called ‘Inchree’ – September 2019

It is so sad to see once well  founded boats left neglected and abandoned. But then again our boat builders need a steady stream of new orders to support the livelihood of themselves and their families. So maybe  we should just accept that there will always be the boats of summer-day past, the boats of summer-day present, and the boats of summer-day  future.  Let us just remember the old and discarded as fondly as we can.

The stretch of tidal water called Bass Pool on the south side of Piel Island has been a focal point for WMYC sailors in 2019.  Abandoned over looking the castle, as high up as can be carried by the tide, where the sand and  seaweed give way to grass, lies a boat called ‘Inchree’.

 

Inchree’s view over Bass Pool and Piel Island beyond

 

Inchree has lost her bilge keels but still retains her big central block of pig iron. In her day, to keep the crew secure, stanchions once surrounded the boat, but only three now remain. The guardrail wire has long since corroded away.

 

She’s so slim!  But that is how boats had to be in the 50s and 60s. They had to be able to sail to windward. The idea of relying on the superbly reliable power of a modern engine was never fully factored into the equation.

 

Nevertheless she was equipped with an engine well that would take a small  3hp to get her home in a flat calm. Her owner wouldn’t need to hang over the stern in a seaway to operate the outboard. As can be seen, the port winch has succumbed to the passing years and is missing, but hidden from view, her starboard twin is still there and can be turned by hand, albeit with difficulty..

 

‘Inchree’s cabin by modern standards is very compact. Perhaps in the days before the cheap high calorie modern diet we didn’t need so much room to move about. Still, a quick glance is evidence alone that the designer thought long and hard to ensure the most convenient internal arrangement.

 

As already said, she had been well thought out. She possessed every convenience that was required in her time.. All members of the family were sure to want to come along and join the adventure.

 

Look at this photograph. With a bit of imagination one can imagine the water surging asunder, and possibly feel ‘Inchree’s bow rising and falling on the passing peaks and troughs. And maybe see a young child, proud of his father at the helm, peering through the window feeling both safe and exhilarated by the sight of the foaming sea.

 

Her name can still be seen clearly inscribed upon her bow. A proud owner there once was!

 

Well, time to get back to the mother ship and set sail to the English seaside resort of Morecambe, which is the next port of call.

 

Wardley’s sailors away we go.

We have a winner: Let’s go Anchor in Bass Pool comic outfit award’

By all accounts the sailing and anchoring adventure to Bass Pool by a group of Wardley’s sailors was a success. Five boats in all dropped anchor and  it really was a great sight to see so many!

In total

  • Fifteen sailors
  • Seven boats
  • Two dogs

Joined in the fun.

See: Let’s go anchor in Bass Pool event: –

As the Sailing Captain,  and with the powers invested in said role,  I hereby announce the winner of the  ‘Let’s go anchor in Bass Pool most comic sailor’s outfit‘ competition: –

Where the prize is  a bottle of :-

 

Kindly donated by our commodore: Steve Adams

 

And the winner is:

Nick ‘Nimrod’ Martin

 

It was a close run thing, all members sported at least one item of comic value, and everyone looked great on the day!

But special recognition must go to Nick for the following reasons: –

  • He came with a choice of hats, a classic skipper’s and a classic pirate’s hat, and also sporting a groovy ‘Treasure Island’ style  themed T-shirt.
  • The first boat to drop anchor in Bass Pool.
  • Brought along  the juiciest looking beef burgers (no contest here!).
  • And whose anchor light shone the brightest, and later on helped a trio of Wardley’s Sailors row back to their boat in the wee hours of the morning.

Please can we all give Nick  a loud round of applause.

You are invited to double click on the photograph!

 

 

Hambleton Flood Risk Management Question & Answers

As you will probably  know by now, the authorities are worried about  the possibility of serious flooding  in the vicinity of our yacht club.

In brief, they have done some computer modelling, and can now confidently predict that 600 houses could be flooded-out when the next mega storm comes along. That is to say, when, an astronomical high tide,  a very low pressure front, and a strong westerly gale come hurtling up the river Wyre together!

Further more, from recent similar events around the country, they’ve worked out how much the average  claimant needs to spend to repair the resulting damage and cover temporary relocation costs. It all amounts to quite a lot! They believe, therefore,  the effort and resources put into the Scheme will be money well spent.

That said, it doesn’t appear that they are particularly worried about the Wardley’s Marine Yacht Club. We will of course be on the wrong side of their magnificent scheme. Still, that is probably where we would want to be anyway, if we want to retain unfettered access to the river. The main blight envisaged at this stage, is possibly the inconvenience caused during the works and maybe reduced access to our land at the upper reaches of the creek. At the recent public meeting we voiced these concerns, and as you will read in the document, they have affirmed that the scheme’s designer/planners will consult with WMYC during the planning.

Please read the attached document to gen up on the finer details. Questions 1 and 11 are of particular interest to us.

 

Hambleton suburbs expected to flood if the worst comes to the worst.