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The boat called ‘Inchree’ – September 2019

It is so sad to see once well  founded boats left neglected and abandoned. But then again our boat builders need a steady stream of new orders to support the livelihood of themselves and their families. So maybe  we should just accept that there will always be the boats of summer-day past, the boats of summer-day present, and the boats of summer-day  future.  Let us just remember the old and discarded as fondly as we can.

The stretch of tidal water called Bass Pool on the south side of Piel Island has been a focal point for WMYC sailors in 2019.  Abandoned over looking the castle, as high up as can be carried by the tide, where the sand and  seaweed give way to grass, lies a boat called ‘Inchree’.

 

Inchree’s view over Bass Pool and Piel Island beyond

 

Inchree has lost her bilge keels but still retains her big central block of pig iron. In her day, to keep the crew secure, stanchions once surrounded the boat, but only three now remain. The guardrail wire has long since corroded away.

 

She’s so slim!  But that is how boats had to be in the 50s and 60s. They had to be able to sail to windward. The idea of relying on the superbly reliable power of a modern engine was never fully factored into the equation.

 

Nevertheless she was equipped with an engine well that would take a small  3hp to get her home in a flat calm. Her owner wouldn’t need to hang over the stern in a seaway to operate the outboard. As can be seen, the port winch has succumbed to the passing years and is missing, but hidden from view, her starboard twin is still there and can be turned by hand, albeit with difficulty..

 

‘Inchree’s cabin by modern standards is very compact. Perhaps in the days before the cheap high calorie modern diet we didn’t need so much room to move about. Still, a quick glance is evidence alone that the designer thought long and hard to ensure the most convenient internal arrangement.

 

As already said, she had been well thought out. She possessed every convenience that was required in her time.. All members of the family were sure to want to come along and join the adventure.

 

Look at this photograph. With a bit of imagination one can imagine the water surging asunder, and possibly feel ‘Inchree’s bow rising and falling on the passing peaks and troughs. And maybe see a young child, proud of his father at the helm, peering through the window feeling both safe and exhilarated by the sight of the foaming sea.

 

Her name can still be seen clearly inscribed upon her bow. A proud owner there once was!

 

Well, time to get back to the mother ship and set sail to the English seaside resort of Morecambe, which is the next port of call.

 

Wardley’s sailors away we go.

Anchoring at Bass Pool full report. August 2019

A brief synopsis goes like so: –

Five Wardley’s yachts entered ‘Bass Pool’ to drop anchor, three  lay there for the whole night.

Those that felt secure enough to trust their ground tackle all had big heavy hooks with plenty of chain, or had the modern  delta type anchors that cut deep and efficiently into the sand and mud.

Those who relied on their Chart-plotter for a suitable location were punished severely  by an  ebbing tide, and  were left embarrassingly  high and dry. The moral here is don’t trust the men from the ministry and their new fangled electronic charts.

Those who sailed furthest into the pool dried out briefly until the tide returned.

Those on an imaginary  line between the lighthouse and the castle brief elevated a few inches and settled again once the flood tide began.

Only those gently swinging at the outer margins of Bass Pool stayed afloat throughout.

Skippers with ladies aboard opted for the perceived greater safety of the large buoys closest to the pub.

Fifteen sailors and two Wardley’s dogs joined in the club event that took place overlooking ‘Bass Pool’ behind Piel castle. Everyone had a great time and later mingled with the other party goers on the island.

The night at anchor was quiet All those involved returned home safely the following day.

Lots of people on the island.

Continue reading Anchoring at Bass Pool full report. August 2019

The Grand Flotilla, May 2019

(above, our club secretary approaches the anchorage)

The first big event of 2019. Seven Wardleys Marine Yacht Club boats meet at the Ship Inn before heading up the coast to Ravenglass and beyond.

The weather was great with a soldier’s wind  across Morecambe Bay. We all creamed across in double quick order. Some boat moored up, some anchored. All sailors made it the pub for drinks, followed by a slap up  meal prepared by King Steven of Piel Island.

The flotilla is still on going as this post is being edited. It is currently  at Kippford up in Scotland.

Please enjoy the photographs with fun captions. The photos speak for the themselves given the happiness writ large on our member’s faces.

Kangie heading out on yet another great adventure
Jay with the Wardley’s MYC mascot
FE FI FO thumb I smell the blood of a Wadley’s Yachtsman”
Janvier Six (6th January) getting ready to catch a buoy.
Janvier Six’s anchor man
Wardley’s MYC senior yachtsman survey the anchorage.
Rivendel cracking-on up the coast of Cumbria.
Rivendel closing in on a safe haven.
The mighty SIKA flying her colours, goes into battle with the monster
SIKA pausing in Bass Pool before heading in to find a mooring.
Fantastic work done to SIKA is back from Skippool looking every bit a new boat.
Super glossy Nimrod hoves into view. John G. would love the engine on, but Skipper Nick is all for saving the planet.
Happy days out on Morecambe Bay. Nimrod heading in to find a mooring.
Jamila keeps an eye on the flotilla as it arrives at Piel. This is the first stop before heading up the Kippford via Ravenglass and Whitehaven.
Wardley’s boat are in fierce competition for available buoys. Kyle 2 and Sika are amongst the first to settle down for a night at the Ship Inn.
WMYC members toast the start of the Grand Flotilla outside the Ship Inn.
Outside the Ship Inn about for go in for dinner. Beautiful weather all day. It’s always the same at Piel — Bloody Mavellous!
Dinner is served in the dinning room out looking the garden.
A view down the river to Barrow in Furness. An amazing photograph of the submarine sheds ,with the shipping docks and some moor yachts in the foreground.
The sea chart showing the way up to Whitehaven, and then across to Ramsey on the Isle of Man.

Take a look at some of the original photos on Microsoft’s Onedrive. 

Click on the link below: –

The Grand Flotilla’s photographs

Piel Island and RNLI action, May 2019

 

About five Wardley’s boat sailed over to Piel Island off Walney Island during the recent bank holiday weekend, some  on differing days. Everyone reported having a great time and feeling exhilarated to be back on the open seas.

The weather was absolute great. The winds were fair and the sun was out for most of the time.

(Comments at work during the following week: ‘Now what exotic place did you fly off to during the bank holiday Simon’?).

The title photo above is a telephoto image, from the jetty, of Kyle 2 (Snapdragon 24) approaching the island. For all intents and purposes it looks like Andy Sargent is about to be gobbled-up by an angry orange monster,  but rest assured, the windfarm service boat was some distance behind.

Link to PHOTOS – will open in Microsoft one drive:-

Click here to see photos

(Note: all are hi-definition photos, so feel free to double-click on any to zoom in )

RNLI rescue

Later on that evening, we witnessed a late night rescue! The first we realize something was going on was when the RNLI station suddenly lit up like Piccadilly Circus, then the big boat came splashing down the long slip like a giant Log flume ride at Blackpool Pleasure Beach. The smaller inflatable rescue boat also was launched. Then for several hour we were treated to the spectacle of boats rushing up and down the channel with eye dazzling spotlights panning in all directions. At regular intervals, serious firework style rescue flares hissed up into the sky with a loud pop, lighting up the water below and creating a feeling  excitement and trepidation. We learnt the following day that a tender had got loose from a moored yacht with no oars or outboard. The poor chap on board got whisked off into Morecambe Bay in the dead of night on a powerful tide. He/she must have been terrified.

Click for a report: –

RNLI report

 

RNLI donation and Crane-in April 2019

(Above: our Commodore Steve Adams handing over to the  RNLI the money raised at our Christmas dinner)

The  Wardley’s Marine Yacht Club 2019 crane-in day was a massive success! Everything went according to plan.

Hats off to everyone!

 

Crew members waiting for the action to start.

 

Plenty of members came, and there was no protesting going on! Formidable looking ‘Les Gillets Jaunes’ characters were everywhere, but in the case of WMYC it was all a magnificent effort laid on to shift boats around a yard and to put boats in Morecambe Bay.

 

It was a tight fit, our crane driver for the day was the boss  Mr. Daley  himself.  He confidently drove his big vehicle in and amongst our boats. As can be seen, he struggled to find space such was the crammed nature of our boat yard!

 

Crane assisted flying boats were soon seen hovering over head.

 

Higher and higher they got! 

 

Jamila is next. No bumps and damage to the mast this time around.

 

Yo ho the drunken sailor! Well, not really, unfortunately the new mooring was laid too close to a big hump, which threatens the rudder.

 

A WMY crew member, early on good Friday, enjoying the last drop of sleepiness before the fun begins.

 

Two Wardley’s boats safely tucked away in the  Fleetwood marina.

 

And  finally a  big thanks to all who lent a hand in any shape or form. And in particular, to our banks-man Michael Morris (directing the crane movements). And also to the wonderful ladies in the club house who supplied us with food and drink throughout the morning.

Job well done!